New Opportunities in the Care of Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

The goal of this initiative is to improve the care of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common childhood form of muscular dystrophy and characteristic manifestations are progressive muscle weakness, cardiorespiratory impairment, and premature death. Gene therapy provides a new avenue to treat life‐limiting neuromuscular disorders. Given the novelty of these therapies, clinicians involved in the care of patients with DMD may not be aware of their associated evidence and implementation. This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

New Perspectives in the Front-line Treatment of Metastatic Bladder Cancer

This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, to learn and share best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (a/mUC) of the bladder comprises a small subset of all urothelial tumors but accounts for the majority of the rapid mortality associated with this disease. Over the last decade, accelerating basic science research has enabled a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of urothelial tumors, leading to the development of novel treatment strategies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have demonstrated encouraging results in the first-line and second-line treatment of mUC as well as in treatment-naïve cisplatin-ineligible patients with some durable responses and a favorable toxicity profile when compared to further chemotherapy. More recently, a new ICI/antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) combination has been approved. Given these changes, educational gaps exist for clinicians treating patients with advanced or metastatic UC in the areas of (1) determining cisplatin/platinum eligibility, (2) use of immuno-oncologic (IO) agents and IO/ADC combinations, and (3) managing adverse events associated with these treatments. This social learning experience will address these gaps and provide the opportunity to collaborate.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Optimizing Treatment for Patients with CLL

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in Western countries, with an age-adjusted incidence of 4.6 per 100,000 individuals per year. As small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) refers to the same malignant process with primary nodal involvement rather than blood, these are generally managed as a single condition (CLL/SLL). The selection of therapies for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL/SLL requires consideration of several factors including previous therapies, disease characteristics, and patient-specific factors such as co-morbidities and concurrent medications. Given the recency of new research into these targeted treatments and new approvals, clinicians lack background knowledge of the most current evidence and guideline recommendations in the treatment of CLL/SLL. Even within national guidelines, specific recommendations for initial treatment choice and sequencing are not directed. This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/ small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Turning Complexity into Clarity in Advanced Cervical Cancer

The current treatment of advanced, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer is difficult, especially as treatment progresses to the second line. Considerations for treatment are nuanced and numerous. Factors include prior treatments, treatment timing, and patient preference. The advent of targeted therapies has brought improved outcomes for those patients whose tumors harbor specific mutations. Still for those who are ineligible for targeted therapies, currently available options are lacking. Agents in the pipeline of development and potential approval offer hope for the treatment of this difficult to manage disease. The goal of this educational curriculum, Turning Complexity into Clarity in Advanced Cervical Cancer, is to establish impactful small group interactions between members of the cervical cancer care team that will, through a variety of collaborative educational experiences, help them in learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with cervical cancer.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Curriculum is Currently Closed

Turning Complexity into Clarity in AML

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be the most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of 5.5 cases per 100,000 persons annually. As such, more education is needed on key topics including use of induction therapy in the non-elderly population, treating suboptimal response to induction therapy, best practices for measurable (or minimal) residual disease assessment, and proper use of maintenance therapy..The goal of this educational curriculum, Turning Complexity into Clarity in AML, is to establish impactful small group interactions between members of the AML care team that will, through a variety of collaborative educational experiences, help them in learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with AML.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Curriculum is Currently Closed

Turning Complexity into Clarity in Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

Often seen in Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), arise as a consequence of immune system involvement and can have myriad health consequences. Both CIDP and MMN are characterized by complex presentations and frequent misdiagnoses. CIDP shows gradual peripheral nerve demyelination, leading to weakness and sensory loss, while MMN presents with asymmetric weakness devoid of sensory complications. With an array of treatment options, managing polyneuropathy in CIDP and MMN can be challenging. This collaborative platform serves as a unifying space for healthcare providers, facilitating the exchange of insights and elevating the standard of care for patients affected by CIDP and MMN. In this learning activity, you will learn how to enhance the lives of CIDP and MMN patients via a program promoting local and cross-community support, driving effective practice-sharing for better outcomes.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Turning Complexity into Clarity in HAE Prophylaxis

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease affecting approximately 1 in 67,000 individuals, with no identified differences in prevalence due to sex or ethnicity. The disease commonly presents with recurrent attacks of swelling in any part of the body. Given the physical and psychosocial impact of HAE on patients and their families, many patients benefit from effective long-term prophylaxis. However, there are numerous clinical gaps impacting the initiation of effective HAE prophylaxis. This collaborative social learning platform aims to help close those gaps by establishing a network of providers who can connect with and support each other with the aim of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients needing long term HAE prophylaxis. By immersing learners in a personalized educational experience, this program explores the management of HAE in a way that is both informative and practical.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Curriculum is Currently Closed

Unlocking the Gaps to Improve SMA Outcomes

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) can be a debilitating condition causing immobility, respiratory difficulties, and reduced lifespan. But with the advent of new disease-modifying therapies, the prognosis for patients with SMA has been completely altered. These treatments may help patients live longer, creating unique clinical needs. Adults now make up more than a quarter of patients with SMA. However, there are no specific guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adult patients, leading to gaps in their diagnosis and management. Adult care is complex and requires multidisciplinary care. This collaborative CME provides the opportunity to learn and share best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with SMA.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Unveiling Anemia in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Welcome to our interactive and engaging educational initiative on managing anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Anemia is a common issue in MDS, causing symptoms like fatigue, pallor, shortness of breath, and light-headedness. It can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life and lead to complications such as iron overload and red blood cell transfusion dependence. Moreover, anemia and transfusion dependence are associated with poor outcomes in MDS. In this program, you will learn the optimal time to initiate anemia treatment, how best to dose luspatercept and address adverse events, and familiarize yourself with emerging data in the treatment of anemia related to low-risk MDS to better help your patients.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Curriculum is Currently Closed