Optimizing Treatment for Patients with CLL

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in Western countries, with an age-adjusted incidence of 4.6 per 100,000 individuals per year. As small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) refers to the same malignant process with primary nodal involvement rather than blood, these are generally managed as a single condition (CLL/SLL). The selection of therapies for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL/SLL requires consideration of several factors including previous therapies, disease characteristics, and patient-specific factors such as co-morbidities and concurrent medications. Given the recency of new research into these targeted treatments and new approvals, clinicians lack background knowledge of the most current evidence and guideline recommendations in the treatment of CLL/SLL. Even within national guidelines, specific recommendations for initial treatment choice and sequencing are not directed. This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/ small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

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Advancements in Treating Early-Stage Biochemical Recurrence in Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with non-metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (nmHSPC). Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer in men worldwide. Most men are diagnosed as having localized disease because of the widespread use of prostate-specific antigen screening. Men diagnosed as having clinically localized prostate cancer have multiple disease management options, including active surveillance, surgery, or radiotherapy. After local therapy, the treatment of early-stage non-metastatic biochemical recurrence (BCR) in hormone-sensitive (or castrate-sensitive) prostate cancer (HSPC) is not clear cut and options are limited. Treatment options also differ based on whether the patient has a low-risk or high-risk prostate cancer.

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New Perspectives in the Front-line Treatment of Metastatic Bladder Cancer

This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, to learn and share best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (a/mUC) of the bladder comprises a small subset of all urothelial tumors but accounts for the majority of the rapid mortality associated with this disease. Over the last decade, accelerating basic science research has enabled a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of urothelial tumors, leading to the development of novel treatment strategies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have demonstrated encouraging results in the first-line and second-line treatment of mUC as well as in treatment-naïve cisplatin-ineligible patients with some durable responses and a favorable toxicity profile when compared to further chemotherapy. More recently, a new ICI/antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) combination has been approved. Given these changes, educational gaps exist for clinicians treating patients with advanced or metastatic UC in the areas of (1) determining cisplatin/platinum eligibility, (2) use of immuno-oncologic (IO) agents and IO/ADC combinations, and (3) managing adverse events associated with these treatments. This social learning experience will address these gaps and provide the opportunity to collaborate.

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New Frontiers with BCMA Targeting in the Treatment of Heavily Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal plasma cell disorder arising from the bone marrow and is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the United States (US), with an incidence of approximately 35,000 new cases per year. While progression-free survival (PFS) benefit is often seen with MM therapeutics, overall survival (OS) benefit is rarely seen with novel therapies, and improvements in PFS are still associated with adverse events and long-term disease refractoriness. Over the past few decades, rigorous pre-clinical and clinical research has led to the discovery of novel therapies that have dramatically changed the treatment landscape of MM in the frontline as well as in the relapsed/refractory setting. Despite implementing multimodal approaches to treat MM, the major challenge remains that the vast majority of patients eventually relapse and become refractory to multiple drug classes. Additionally, patients require continuous treatment throughout the disease course, which can negatively affect their quality of life due to potential therapy-related side effects. This collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other locally, as well as those from different communities, with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma.

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How MS Care Has Evolved Since the COVID-19 Pandemic

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have learned valuable lessons pertinent to MS care. This includes knowledge about COVID-19 severity and infection risk (especially as it relates to DMT selection), a much greater understanding of how DMTs affect SARS-CoV-2 vaccine responses, ways to potentially optimize vaccine responses, and the role of telemedicine. This program covers some of these major lessons learned about MS care. The Gather-ed collaborative social learning platform establishes a network of providers who can support each other with the goal of learning and sharing best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with MS.

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Curriculum is Currently Closed

Unlocking the Gaps to Improve SMA Outcomes

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) can be a debilitating condition causing immobility, respiratory difficulties, and reduced lifespan. But with the advent of new disease-modifying therapies, the prognosis for patients with SMA has been completely altered. These treatments may help patients live longer, creating unique clinical needs. Adults now make up more than a quarter of patients with SMA. However, there are no specific guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adult patients, leading to gaps in their diagnosis and management. Adult care is complex and requires multidisciplinary care. This collaborative CME provides the opportunity to learn and share best practices that will improve outcomes for patients with SMA.

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Turning Complexity into Clarity in Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

Often seen in Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), arise as a consequence of immune system involvement and can have myriad health consequences. Both CIDP and MMN are characterized by complex presentations and frequent misdiagnoses. CIDP shows gradual peripheral nerve demyelination, leading to weakness and sensory loss, while MMN presents with asymmetric weakness devoid of sensory complications. With an array of treatment options, managing polyneuropathy in CIDP and MMN can be challenging. This collaborative platform serves as a unifying space for healthcare providers, facilitating the exchange of insights and elevating the standard of care for patients affected by CIDP and MMN. In this learning activity, you will learn how to enhance the lives of CIDP and MMN patients via a program promoting local and cross-community support, driving effective practice-sharing for better outcomes.

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Unveiling Anemia in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Welcome to our interactive and engaging educational initiative on managing anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Anemia is a common issue in MDS, causing symptoms like fatigue, pallor, shortness of breath, and light-headedness. It can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life and lead to complications such as iron overload and red blood cell transfusion dependence. Moreover, anemia and transfusion dependence are associated with poor outcomes in MDS. In this program, you will learn the optimal time to initiate anemia treatment, how best to dose luspatercept and address adverse events, and familiarize yourself with emerging data in the treatment of anemia related to low-risk MDS to better help your patients.

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Curriculum is Currently Closed

Addressing the Challenges in Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis and Management

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia in older individuals (≥ 65 years) throughout the world. In the United States (U.S.), more than 6 million individuals carry this diagnosis, with many yet to be diagnosed. AD follows a prolonged, progressive disease course that begins with pathophysiological changes years before any clinical manifestations are observed. Individuals harboring such changes may have no symptoms or may exhibit clinical manifestations varying from memory lapses to severe and debilitating loss of memory and cognitive function. There are several clinical gaps including the use of biomarkers in AD diagnosis, knowledge of new and emerging disease-modifying treatments, and multidisciplinary care coordination in early AD. Through an interactive educational initiative bringing together AD experts and clinicians involved in AD care, we aim to educate all those involved to improve the care of patients with early AD.

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Advanced Endometrial Cancer in the Immunotherapy Age

Endometrial cancer is among the few cancers increasing in incidence and mortality in the United State and remains the most common gynecologic cancer diagnosed. To improve clinical outcomes, clinicians treating patients with endometrial cancer need to understand the molecular classification of the disease, the newest guidelines on management, and the evidence underlying these recommendations. Along with this, clinicians must be aware of the most effective ways to manage possible adverse events as well as be cognizant of how best to address racial disparities in care. This educational initiative will allow clinicians to learn and discuss these crucial points in diagnosing and managing these patients to increase long-term survival. Given the rapid shift in best practices occurring in this area and the fact that current NCCN Guidelines classify endometrial cancers into 1 of 4 molecular groups, as opposed to the traditional 2 groups, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date as advances in areas such as biomarker research continue to be made. This educational activity allows clinicians to engage in interprofessional discussions with knowledgeable experts and peers to more fully understand how to integrate these new treatment approaches into their day-to-day practice and establish actionable plans to improve outcomes for their patients.

CME/CE Accreditation Information

Curriculum is Currently Closed